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Learn about our National Historic Landmark site, our foundation’s mission, and our award-winning interpretive center.

Find details about the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center: hours, admission rates, special exhibits, and upcoming events.

Become a member of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation today to receive our magazine, free admission, and other benefits.

Support our mission to preserve the “Heart Mountain Relocation Center” site and to tell the story of those who were incarcerated here.

Online Programming During Closure

While the Interpretive Center remains temporarily closed during the global pandemic, we are offering a variety of online programming during...

While the Interpretive Center remains temporarily closed during the global pandemic, we are offering a variety of online programming during this closure.

Online offerings on Mondays will feature live streaming programs focused on various aspects of the site’s history. Tuesdays will highlight multimedia content created by the Heart Mountain community through the years. Wednesdays will focus on the stories of individual artifacts from the foundation’s collections. On Thursdays, Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation Board Chair Shirley Ann Higuchi will present selected readings from her upcoming book, Setsuko’s Secret, which tells the story of her family’s time at the camp. Finally, Fridays will feature virtual tours of the interpretive center and historic site, including areas not yet open to the public, including the original barrack and root cellar.

Dusted Off LIVE: Transforming the Natural World

Agriculture was just one way Heart Mountain incarcerees transformed the natural world. In this installment of Dusted Off, registrar Brandon...

Agriculture was just one way Heart Mountain incarcerees transformed the natural world. In this installment of Dusted Off, registrar Brandon Daake showcases how incarcerees used the natural resources found around them to create objects of art and devotion.

You can find more information on the Heart Mountain sutra stones at the 50 Objects/Stories blog.

https://youtu.be/--nNYmMZshk
Dusted Off: Transforming the Natural World

Online Program: The Heart Mountain Miracle

The Heart Mountain Agriculture Department had less than a year to figure out how to convert barren high desert into...

The Heart Mountain Agriculture Department had less than a year to figure out how to convert barren high desert into farmland capable of feeding nearly 11,000 people. Join executive director Dakota Russell for a look into how the camp's incarcerees achieved what would become known as the "Heart Mountain Miracle."

https://youtu.be/nrXLDVsrYrE
The Heart Mountain Miracle

Online Program: Notable Women of Heart Mountain

In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting the lives of some of Heart Mountain’s most influential women. The...

In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting the lives of some of Heart Mountain’s most influential women. The experience of the camp showed many the importance of challenging stereotypes. This program celebrates three women who refused to conform to simple ideas of race and gender, and rose to become leaders not only among Japanese Americans, but Americans as a whole.

https://youtu.be/GHEwIrWWzCw
Notable Women of Heart Mountain

Learn more about notable women of Heart Mountain through their own words in the following books:

Citizen 13660

Mine Okubo was one of over one hundred thousand people of Japanese descent--nearly two-thirds of whom were American citizens--who were forced into "protective custody" shortly after Pearl Harbor. Citizen 13660, Okubo's graphic memoir of life in relocation centers in California and Utah, illuminates this experience with poignant illustrations and witty, candid text. Now available with a new introduction by Christine Hong and in a wide-format artist edition, this graphic novel can reach a new generation of readers and scholars.

When the Cherry Blossoms Fell

Nine-year-old Michiko Minagawa bids her father good-bye before her birthday celebration. She doesn't know the government has ordered all Japanese-born men out of the province. Ten days later, her family joins hundreds of Japanese Canadians on a train to the interior of British Columbia. Even though her aunt Sadie jokes about it, they have truly reached the "Land of No". There are no paved roads, no streetlights and not streetcars. The house in which they are to live is dirty and drafty. At her new school Michiko learns the truth of her situation. She must face local prejudice, the worst winter in forty years, and her first Christmas without her father.

Stubborn Twig: Three Generations in the Life of a Japanese American Family

Stubborn Twig is a classic American story, a story of immigrants making their way in a new land. It is a living work of social history that rings with the power of truth and the drama of fiction, a moving saga about the challenges of becoming an American. Masuo Yasui traveled from Japan across the "other Oregon Trail‚" the one that spanned the Pacific Ocean in 1903. Like most immigrants, he came with big dreams and empty pockets. Working on the railroads, in a cannery, and as a houseboy before settling in Hood River, Oregon, he opened a store, raised a large family, and became one of the area's most successful orchardists. As Masuo broke the race barrier in the local business community, his American-born children broke it in school, scouts and sports, excelling in most everything they tried. For the Yasui's first-born son, the constraints and contradictions of being both Japanese and American led to tragedy. But his seven brothers and sisters prevailed, becoming doctors, lawyers, teachers, and farmers. It was a classic tale of the American dream come true‚ until December 7, 1941, changed their lives forever. The Yasuis were among the more than 110,000 people of Japanese ancestry along the West Coast who were forced from their homes and interned in vast inland‚ "relocation camps." Masuo was arrested as a spy and imprisoned for the rest of the war; his family was shamed and broken. Yet the Yasuis endured, as succeeding generations took up the challenge of finding their identity as Americans. Stubborn Twig is their story‚ a story at once tragic and triumphant, one that bears eloquent witness to both the promise and the peril of America.

Onsite Tour: Barrack

In 2015, the Foundation returned an original Heart Mountain barrack to the site and began restoring it. Join executive director...

In 2015, the Foundation returned an original Heart Mountain barrack to the site and began restoring it. Join executive director Dakota Russell on a behind-the-scenes tour of the barrack, where he'll discuss this building's history and our plans for it in the future.

https://youtu.be/5Z7KC4BI8lk
Onsite Tour: Barrack

Setsuko’s Secret – Meals in Camp

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation Board Chair Shirley Ann Higuchi presents selected readings from her upcoming book, Setsuko’s Secret, which tells the...

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation Board Chair Shirley Ann Higuchi presents selected readings from her upcoming book, Setsuko’s Secret, which tells the story of her family’s time at the camp.

This week's passage focuses on meals in camp and the disruption of family eating patterns by the mess halls.

https://youtu.be/lgxsfaADibI
Setsuko's Secret - Meals in Camp

Dusted Off LIVE: Geta

In “Dusted Off,” registrar Brandon Daake highlights unique artifacts from the Heart Mountain collections. This week, we’ll be looking at...

In “Dusted Off,” registrar Brandon Daake highlights unique artifacts from the Heart Mountain collections. This week, we’ll be looking at geta, the traditional Japanese sandals that became a vital tool for surviving the cramped and primitive conditions of the camp.

https://youtu.be/LtqJr5ZYF0U
Dusted Off: Geta

While Heart Mountain Interpretive Center is closed due to the COVID-19 outbreak, we’re taking our programs online! If you’ve enjoyed this week’s online offerings, consider making a donation to support our work during this challenging time.

Online Program: Kids Behind Barbed Wire

For Japanese American children, being taken from their homes and sent to Heart Mountain was a confusing and frightening experience....

For Japanese American children, being taken from their homes and sent to Heart Mountain was a confusing and frightening experience. In time—and with lots of help from their families and friends—they learned to adjust to life in the camp. Heart Mountain Interpretive Center Executive Director, Dakota Russell, explores the experience of the children who were incarcerated at Heart Mountain.

This is a family-friendly program and we encourage you and the whole family to join us as we explore what growing up inside Heart Mountain was like.

https://youtu.be/sJPbGsqgBnA
Kids Behind Barbed Wire Presentation

Learn more about the experience of children at Heart Mountain in Shig Yabu and Willie Ito's illustrated book Hello Maggie! and Shig's book Boy of Heart Mountain.

You can also listen to a charming discussion with Shig and Willie from NPR's Storycorps podcast here.

Read more about children's experiences at Heart Mountain in the 2018 Spring issue of Kokoro Kara (page 15), our quarterly magazine.

Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation Coronavirus Response

The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation takes the safety of our members and visitors seriously. To that end, we are making...

The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation takes the safety of our members and visitors seriously. To that end, we are making some operational changes in response to the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus:

  • Heart Mountain Interpretive Center is currently CLOSED to the public until Friday, April 17. At that time, we will assess the situation and decide whether to reopen.
  • The hospital grounds, memorial and honor roll, and Setsuko Saito Higuchi Interpretive Trail remain open for self-guided explanation. Our staff will also be offering guided tours of the grounds, by appointment only, on a limited basis. Call the interpretive center for more information. (307-754-8000)
  • All events and programs at the center for the next eight weeks have been canceled, including our May 2 Children’s Day event. We are offering an array of online programs and content over the next few weeks. Click here to explore our online programming.
  • General registration for the Heart Mountain Pilgrimage in July is open at this time. Please review our cancelation policies before registering. If circumstances force us to cancel the Pilgrimage, all registrants will receive a full refund.
  • We will continue to provide updates on this summer’s events, including the Pilgrimage and our NEH teacher workshops, in the coming weeks. For the latest information, follow Heart Mountain on Facebook and Twitter.
  • Please refer to the COVID-19 page of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) for the latest updates on the pandemic and guidance on dealing with this physically, psychologically, and logistically.

Thank you for your patience and support as we navigate these uncertain times. If you have questions, please reach out to us. If you would like to support our work during this difficult period, please consider becoming a member or making a donation or a purchase from our online store.

Pilgrimage 2020: General Registration now open

At this time, we are still planning to hold the 2020 Heart Mountain Pilgrimage. Please visit our Pilgrimage page for...

At this time, we are still planning to hold the 2020 Heart Mountain Pilgrimage. Please visit our Pilgrimage page for up-to-date details and for our cancelation policy. We hope to see you this July.

General Registration for the 2020 Heart Mountain Pilgrimage is now open! Join us this summer for an incredible three-day event that features film screenings, panel discussions, educational sessions, site tours, and much more.

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Join us for an array of special events at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center and around Cody & Powell, Wyoming!