Loading

Learn about our National Historic Landmark site, our foundation’s mission, and our award-winning interpretive center.

Find details about the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center: hours, admission rates, special exhibits, and upcoming events.

Become a member of the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation today to receive our magazine, free admission, and other benefits.

Support our mission to preserve the “Heart Mountain Relocation Center” site and to tell the story of those who were incarcerated here.

Podcast follows consequences of EO 9066

Executive Order 9066 was signed by FDR on February 19, 1942, forever altering the lives of hundreds of thousands of...

Executive Order 9066 was signed by FDR on February 19, 1942, forever altering the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. On this 78th anniversary of that fateful event, we revisit the excellent in-depth podcast "Order 9066" from APM Reports and Smithsonian National Museum of American History. Featuring an array of interviews with former incarcerees (and some special bonus episodes featuring music at Heart Mountain), this is a must-listen! Check out episodes, photos, and extra features here.

Want to know more? Read a special interview we conducted with the show's producers that is featured in the Autumn 2018 issue of Kokoro Kara on our newsletter page.

Opinion piece compares detention of people based on nationality

HMWF Chair Shirley Ann Higuchi addresses the detention and questioning of Iranian Americans at the U.S./Canada border in January 2020....

HMWF Chair Shirley Ann Higuchi addresses the detention and questioning of Iranian Americans at the U.S./Canada border in January 2020.

"Regardless of the reasons for the strike on Soleimani, the reaction by border officials was another uncomfortable reminder of the hysteria that forced 120,000 Japanese Americans, including both sets of my parents and grandparents, into camps during World War II.

It should go without saying that Soleimani was an agent of chaos who had destabilized the Middle East and West Asia through his support of terrorist groups. In December 1941, the Japanese government was engaged in violent empire-building in the Pacific, attacking neutral nations such as the United States and killing thousands of innocent people. No one defended their actions, either.

But extending the cloak of suspicion over those whose ethnic backgrounds connect to those countries was contrary to American ideals in 1942 and is today, too."

Read the full article HERE.

Willie, Shig, and a Bird Named Maggie Podcast Episode

Heart Mountain incarceree Shig Yabu and Topaz incarceree Willie Ito speak about their experiences during the war in this episode...

Heart Mountain incarceree Shig Yabu and Topaz incarceree Willie Ito speak about their experiences during the war in this episode of the Story Corps podcast.

Click here to listen to the episode and see more photographs of Shig and Willie.

2020 Winter Program Series returns!

The Winter Program Series returns with three brand new topics in 2020! Join us in January, February, and March and...

The Winter Program Series returns with three brand new topics in 2020! Join us in January, February, and March and learn about the Nisei animator Bob Kuwahara, the story of the orphaned baby Virgie, and a highlight of some of the notable women of Heart Mountain. Read more about these programs below.

The programs are included with the admission fee for the interpretive center, or passes can be purchased for the entire season of presentations.

Bob Kuwahara, Issei Animator
January 18, 2020 at 1:00pm
Nothing improves a Saturday like watching some cartoons. In this program, we’ll discuss the life of artist Bob Kuwahara and screen a few of his best animated shorts. Prior to the war, Kuwahara worked for Walt Disney. After his career was derailed by his incarceration at Heart Mountain, Kuwahara joined the team at TerryToons Studios, where he created his most famous character: the “Japanese House Mouse” Hashimoto-San.
More info on our Facebook page HERE

The Ballad of Baby Virgie
February 29, 2020 at 1:00pm
In early 1943, a Heart Mountain guard discovered a new mother wandering near the camp’s fence, completely naked, in the dead of night. After the traumatized young woman was committed to a mental hospital, it fell to the camp’s Social Welfare Department to find a new home for her infant. It was just one of many cases taken on by the two women who headed up the department, Virgil Payne and Peggy Fujioka. This program will explore how this team tackled some of the most challenging and sensitive problems at Heart Mountain.
More info on our Facebook page HERE

Notable Women of Heart Mountain
March 28, 2020 at 1:00pm
In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month by highlighting the lives of some of Heart Mountain’s most influential women. An unexpected side effect of institutionalized life in the camp was the breakdown of traditional gender roles. This program will celebrate the women who exploited that opportunity to become leaders in the community.
More info on our Facebook page HERE

Applications for Educator Workshops DUE March 1st!

The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation is now accepting applications for two week-long workshops for educators to be held in Wyoming...

The Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation is now accepting applications for two week-long workshops for educators to be held in Wyoming this summer. The workshops, entitled “Heart Mountain, Wyoming, and the Japanese American Incarceration,” are supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, and will take place during the weeks of July 19-24 and July 26-31. The Foundation is currently accepting applications for participants.

During the workshops, participants will learn about the history of Japanese American incarceration from a renowned group of experts from around the country. The faculty also includes former incarcerees from the camps, such as Sam Mihara, who was confined at Heart Mountain as a child. In 2018, Mihara received the Paul E. Gagnon Prize from the National Council of History Education for his presentations about his incarceration.

Workshops are open to full-time or part-time teachers and librarians in public, charter, independent, and religiously affiliated schools, as well as home schooling parents. Other 5-12 school-system personnel, such as administrators, substitute teachers, and curriculum developers, are also eligible to participate. Teachers at schools in the United States or its territorial possessions or Americans teaching in foreign schools where at least 50 percent of the students are American nationals can also participate in this program. If accepted, applicants will receive a $1,200 stipend to assist with travel expenses. Interested educators can apply via the program’s website HERE. The application period closes March 1, 2020.

The Foundation’s executive director, Dakota Russell, said that the workshops would not be possible without a grant from the National Endowment for Humanities. “The NEH and Heart Mountain share a common belief in the power of place,” Russell said. “Their Landmarks of American History and Culture program focuses on getting teachers to the sites where history happened. We are extremely honored they have selected us as a participant this year.”

For questions or more information on the workshops, email juliea@heartmountain.org.

New podcast episode about the children of Heart Mountain

Anna Sales of New York Public Radio visited the Heart Mountain Pilgrimage this summer and spoke with former incarcerees who...

Anna Sales of New York Public Radio visited the Heart Mountain Pilgrimage this summer and spoke with former incarcerees who experienced life behind barbed wire as children. Listen to the latest episode of the excellent podcast Death, Sex & Money which focuses on the children of Heart Mountain.

Click HERE to listen to the podcast on their website

Join us for an array of special events at the Heart Mountain Interpretive Center and around Cody & Powell, Wyoming!